KompareIt > Home & Garden > Landscaping > Sod vs Seed

Compare Sod vs Seeding a Lawn Costs

Sod Overview

All grass starts from a seed. But with sod, the difficult task of planting the seeds and nurturing them until they grow is done for you.

Sod is professionally cultivated. The seeds are planted on a farm and the grass is harvested when it is mature, healthy and free of weeds. The grass is then cut into squares or rolls and sold.

How Much Does Sod Cost?

Sod is expensive - it costs about 20 times more than growing your own grass from seeds.

  • The sod itself usually costs about 10 cents to 30 cents per square foot, depending on the type of grass you select.
  • With professional installation, the total cost could climb to $1 per square foot.
  • If you hire a landscaper to do any sort of prep work, such as ripping out the old grass, removing stumps and/or regrading the lawn, plan on paying $30 to $50 per hour for those services.
Average Sod Installation Prices

Sod Pros

  • No waiting - With sod, you instantly have a beautiful, manicured lawn. There’s no waiting for seeds to sprout. And sod can be installed year-round, while seeds are generally planted in the spring or fall.
  • More durable - Sod isn’t as fragile, at least initially. You don’t have to worry about the lawn being destroyed in the first few weeks by kids or pets trampling across it.
  • Less maintenance - Sod requires far less maintenance in the first few weeks. You’ll need to water and weed the lawn, but not as frequently as you have to with seed.

Sod Cons

  • Pricey - Even if your lawn is just 10,000 square feet (slightly less than one-quarter acre), the total cost for sod installation could be as much as $10,000.
  • Requires a professional - In most cases, laying sod is not a do-it-yourself project. It requires the knowledge and expertise of a professional.

Seed Overview

Seeding a lawn is a time-consuming process. But the results are rewarding. With a bit of hard work and a little luck, you’ll have a plush, green lawn in a matter of one to two months.

There are many different varieties of grass, and thus, many different types of seeds. It is important to do some research before you buy to find out which type of grass performs best in your climate.

How Much Does Seed Cost?

Seeding a lawn is relatively inexpensive. Grass seed usually costs about 1 cent per square foot. For a 10,000-square-foot lawn, that works out to a total cost of $100.

If you don’t already have one, you’ll need to purchase a spreader. Most residential spreaders sell for just $100 to $200.

Seed Pros

  • Affordable - The total project cost for seeding a lawn is usually just a few hundred dollars. That includes the price of the seed and purchasing a spreader.

Seed Cons

  • Time consuming - It usually takes several hours to lay grass seed. If it rains that night, you’ll have to spread more seed the next day. Then, you’ll need to spend the next few weeks watering and weeding the lawn to promote growth. About three weeks after seeding, the grass will begin to sprout.
  • Not ideal for warm climates - Seeding doesn’t work very well in hot climates; it is best in the north, where the winters are cold and the summers are hot. If you live in climate that is hot year round, sod is your best bet.

Find Local Sod Companies Who Will Compete for Your Business

 

Do You Need a Sod Pro Near You?

Answer a few short questions & get free estimates for your project from trusted companies in your area. Or simply call us at: 866-685-9586.

Get Cost Estimates >>

Search Our Site

All Landscaping Articles

Serving USA Including:

  • Birmingham, Alabama
  • Anchorage, Alaska
  • Phoenix, Arizona
  • Little Rock, Arkansas
  • San Francisco, California
  • Oakland, California
  • Los Angeles, California
  • Fremont, California
  • Boulder, Colorado
  • Bridgeport, Connecticut
  • Stamford, Connecticut
  • Norwalk, Connecticut
  • Dover, Delaware
  • Naples, Florida
  • Marco Island, Florida
  • Savannah, Georgia
  • Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Boise City, Idaho
  • Chicago, Illinois
  • Joilet, Illinois
  • Naperville, Illinois
  • Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Carmel, Indiana
  • Des Moines, Iowa
  • Manhatten, Kansas
  • Louisvile, Kentucky
  • Jefferson County, Kentucky
  • New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Metairie, Louisiana
  • Kenner, Louisiana
  • Portland, Maine
  • Biddeford, Maine
  • Baltimore, Maryland
  • Towson, Maryland
  • Boston, Massachusetts
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Quincy, Massachusetts
  • Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • St. Paul, Minnesota
  • Bloomington, Minnesota
  • Gulfport, Mississippi
  • Biloxi, Mississippi
  • St. Louis, Missouri
  • Billings, Montana
  • Omaha, Nebraska
  • Council Bluffs, Nebraska
  • Reno, Nevada
  • Sparks, Nevada
  • Manchester, New Hampshire
  • Nashua, New Hampshire
  • Trenton, New Jersey
  • Ewing, New Jersey
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • New York, New York
  • Long Island, New York
  • Jacksonville, North Carolina
  • Fargo, North Dakota
  • Cleveland, Ohio
  • Elyria, Ohio
  • Mentor, Ohio
  • Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Portland, Oregon
  • Vancouver, Oregon
  • Hillsboro, Oregon
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Camden, Pennsylvania
  • Wilmington, Pennsylvania
  • Providence, Rhode Island
  • New Bedford, Rhode Island
  • Fall Rivers, Rhode Island
  • Columbia, South Carolina
  • Sioux Falls, South Dakota
  • Nashville, Tennessee
  • Davidson, Tennessee
  • Murfreesboro, Tennessee
  • Franklin, Tennessee
  • Midland, Texas
  • Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Burlington, Vermont
  • Charlottesville, Virginia
  • Seattle, Washington
  • Tacoma, Washington
  • Bellevue, Washington
  • Charleston, West Virginia
  • Madison, Wisconsin
  • Casper, Wyoming